2009 H. Bruce Russell Global Innovator's Award

2009 H. Bruce Russell Global Innovator's Award



Prior Winners:
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Mindshift Consortium Wins 10th Annual Global Innovator's Award

The 2009 Global Innovator's Award results were announced last night at the CoreNet Global Summit in Las Vegas, and if there's any doubt about the possibility of big industry changes in a post-recessionary sense, Mindshift Consortium's selection as winner of this presitgious recognition is a sign of major things to come.

GIA Award Finalists
Congratulations to the seven presenting finalists whose cases span a wide array of CRE innovations: Mindshift, Gensler, Turner Construction and Haworth; Bank of America; Johnson Controls; Faithful + Gould; Southwest Michigan First; NBBJ; and Woods Bagot.

Special thanks to Global Innovator's Award sponsors Gensler, UGL Equis, UGL Unisource, and Cushman & Wakefield.


GIA Award Winners
The Mindshift Consortium team, headed by Rex Miller (second from right), celebrates its big win as recipient of the 2009 H. Bruce Russell Global Innovator's Award.
Mindshift Consortium
Nine Keys to Transform a Broken Industry
An irony of the long-running recession is that there's not yet a clear consensus on how the CRE industry will change along with an inevitable shift in business models.

While some industry leaders have told us that this downturn, as profound as it is, will not result in any sea-changes for CRE, there are some outliers or early adopters who disagree. Some of them would say that changing our industry's risk-reward model offers one such opportunity. Others are focused on transforming key parts of our supply chain.

One of them is Mindshift, a consortium of progressively-minded CRE interests specially designated as a 2009 Global Innovator's Finalist.

Mindshift has honed in on the way that corporate facilities are designed and built. For nearly three years, the group has changed the paradigm "from the fragmented self-serving, highly competitive process we've lived with for decades," according to Rex Miller, one of Mindshift's leaders. Joining him were Dean Strombom of Gensler and Mark Iammarino of Turner Construction.

Senior Leaders of CRE
Comprise Award Jury

Another impressive part of the Global Innovator's Award is the judges' panel consisting of some of the CRE (corporate real estate) industry's most experienced senior-level executives. CoreNet Global extends its gratitude to the 2009 panel for contributing the knowledge, expertise and time needed to assess the award nominees cases:

Panel Chair
Frank Robinson, McKesson Corp.
Jury Members
Roy Black, Emory University, Goizueta Business School
Sam Hunter, General Services Administration
Ed Nolan, Hewlett Packard
Trex Morris, Ernst & Young
Sam Unger, Ernst & Young
Roger Gaudette, Ford Land
Charemon Tovar, Sprint/CBRE
GIA 2009, judges and sponsors
CoreNet Global extends its gratitude to the seven industry leaders who served as award judges, and to the executives representing our award sponsors. Judges front row (from left): Roger Gaudette, Charemon Tovar and Sam Hunter. Judges second row (from left): Dr. Roy Black, Frank Robinson, Ed Nolan and Sam Unger. Sponsors (front row from right): Stephen Swicegood of Gensler and Elliott Farber of UGL Equis. (Photos by Amanda Brooks and Richard Kadzis)
Today, the consortium has evolved to a "trust-based, team-driven, integrated and sustainable approach based on implementing best practices that will dramatically cut costs, end delays and create better buildings," contended Miller, who comes from outside real estate and has written on the evolution of social media recently for Futurist Magazine.

"For owners," he emphasized, "this new way of doing business is a win-win," adding that for the CRE industry in general, "it's a top-to-bottom transformation."

Mindshift's approach isn't just vapor or concept. Miller backed the claim through a series of tangible client - provider projects that have overcome "bleak industry (performance) statistics" like nearly 70% of all projects coming in over budget and late, or up to half of the building process resulting in waste - not to overlook the reality that commercial buildings contribute 48% of all green-house gases.

Mindshift members include but also extend beyond: Gensler and Lucchesi Galati (architecture); Aardex and Transwestern (developer/broker); Turner and Solidus (construction); Haworth (furnishings); KPMG (tax); Acoustic Dimensions (engineering); GSA (owner/occupier); and AIA (trade group). All of them integrate with Miller and two other consultants (Gary Hamor and Kyle Davy).

By proactively addressing the full life cycle of a project, the players have attained a key criterion of the business case for sustainability resulting in lower cost, better ROI and higher-quality working environments for clients.

Miller said the Mindshift "connected the dots" between the various players who were already attempting new ways of doing business, "even though most in the industry were doing business as usual." Together, they formed "an almost revolutionary type of contract" surrounding best practices in AWS, BIM, LEED® and other innovative areas.

Since the group's leaders "represented the top of the building 'food chain,'" Miller points out, "they had a real opportunity to change the building paradigm."

Miller insists that Mindshift "really can produce well-designed, sustainable buildings on time and on budget."

If you need further proof, check out Mindshift's new book published by John Wiley & Sons: The Commercial Real Estate Revolution: Nine Keys to Transforming a Broken Industry.

– Richard Kadzis


Industry's Top Practitioners Compete at Emory University for
10th Annual H. Bruce Russell Global Innovator's Award

By Richard Kadzis

Emory University
Corporate real estate's top practitioners for 2009 gathered at Emory University in Atlanta on 4 - 5 August, competing for CoreNet Global's H. Bruce Russell Global Innovator's Award. It's the 10th anniversary of the prestigious industry recognition and the first year the case competition has been held at Emory, which hosted the event at its Goizueta Business School, thanks to the hospitality of Professor Roy Black.

Congratulations to the seven presenting finalists whose cases span a wide array of CRE innovations: Mindshift, Gensler, Turner Construction and Haworth; Bank of America; Johnson Controls; Faithful + Gould; Southwest Michigan First; NBBJ; and Woods Bagot.

Special thanks to Global Innovator's Award sponsors Gensler, UGL Equis, UGL Unisource, and Cushman & Wakefield.

The 2009 Global Innovator's Award results will be announced during the CoreNet Global Summit in Las Vegas on 11 October, so there will be lots more information to share later this year.

Meantime, here's a quick look at the seven finalists, any of whom could have 'the right stuff' to win –like clear solutions to an issue or challenge, well-articulated objectives, and the metrics to back them up.

GIA 2009, Bank of America
The Bank of America team included Hunter Fleshood, Derek Johnson and Nick Friedrich.
Bank of America:
Integrated Command and Control Center

One of the most important factors to note is how many of this year's cases reflect the groundswell of activity forming around sustainable development as a hedge against the worst commercial real estate downturn since 1990 - 92. Maybe it's a case of survival more than responsibility for the time being, but either way, the sustainability adoption curve is on the rise, and Bank of America's (BAC) case underscores the point.

BAC spends more than a million dollars a day on energy across a substantial North American retail and office portfolio of 130M SF located in 34 states and 6,100 locations, as Hunter Fleshood pointed out. "We'd like that number to be smaller," said Fleshood, BAC's senior VP overseeing the U.S. and Canada portfolio.

To address the challenge, Fleshood and his team launched the Integrated Command and Control Center (iC2). The center complements the bank's centralized maintenance model, as well as its huge commitment to sustainability and energy management.

Two years into the initiative, BAC has introduced the iC³ inside 1,700 bank branches and other properties, drastically reducing the frequency and cost of maintenance staff and trucks being deployed on the ground to adjust thermostats, or to deliver a wide array of other energy management fixes from a remote, centralized control room environment. There's a lot more efficiency with key strokes fixing more of the HVAC and other 'comfort' problems normally associated with work environments.

Global Innovator's Celebrates
a Decade of Rich Tradition

Hats off for the 10th anniversary of the H. Bruce Russell Global Innovator's Award!

Launched in 2000 by the former IDRC Foundation, CoreNet Global continued to build the award over a decade's time into one of the most prestigious recognitions for corporate real estate (CRE) professionals.

The innovators and innovations have spanned a wide geography, crossed multiple private and public sectors, touched on a diverse range of disciplines, and brought an incredible array of precedent-setting case studies to CoreNet Global.

They often share one key characteristic: effective partnerships to execute strategy and to deliver measurable value.

About 100 companies, organizations and agencies have competed as finalists for the award over time, but less than 10% of them are actual winners - as judged by their peers with considerable real estate, workplace, service provider and academic experience.
The potential for long-term ROI on the $60-million capital investment is very strong, mainly because BAC is able to leverage the scale of its massive portfolio, added Fleshood. It would also serve as a good resource in times of disaster recovery, he predicted. Plus, if the central network ever goes down, he offered the assurance that up to 3,300 facilities will be able to stand alone and "run on its own" once the plan is fully implemented.

BAC is the first financial services firm to accomplish a portfolio-wide centralized energy management solution, Fleshood also asserted.

It was "the convergence of the right technology, the right time and the right portfolio (in terms of size) that helped us pull it off," injected Derek Johnson, senior VP and iC³ program director for BAC.

Johnson listed the three major "segments" of the command and control center concept as the sensor segment, installation and software development. By integrating the three areas in an IT sense, a key result is that BAC has a deep source of "value-driven data" to help guide or adjust operating decisions and strategies, or allocated more resources.

Fleshood and Johnson, who were joined in the presentation by Nick Friedrich, the program deployment manager, also hinted that their proprietary model could be scalable for or transferable to other retailers or retail-driven companies. They said Wal-Mart, Best Buy, Home Depot and Duke Energy have all expressed interest in the model.

"The same thing is repeatable outside of BAC," concluded Fleshood, who also pointed to 15-17% cost savings and 10-13% energy reduction levels as proof of early ROI.


Faithful + Gould:
Greenville County, SC, Public Schools Capital Construction Program

The Global Innovator's Award has attracted a healthy share of high-quality public sector and public-private sector partnership cases. UK-founded Faithful + Gould added another one to the mix, using its creativity to help the Greenville County School District with an unusual but effective public-private partnership.

GIA 2009, Faithful + Gould
Mike McKinney of Faithful + Gould outlined his firm’s case on behalf of the Greenville County, SC, Public Schools.
Interestingly, it started in 2002 and has now reached its five-year horizon, as the metrics justifiably reflect.

The problem as identified in 1999 was to find a way to fund and rebuild many of the county's outdated public schools and grounds against record-high tax millage levels. The solution became "a home mortgage on steroids," as Faithful + Gould program director Michael McKinney described it.

McKinney outlined how his firm pulled together a group of four capital program partners and formed a non-profit known as Institutional Resources (InRe) to conduct all of the financial, design, bidding, construction planning, master planning and warranty functions associated with the 44 new schools and 26 renovations in the scope of the plan.

"We used private bonds in a public funding sense," McKinney emphasized about what he regards as a key innovation realized with the collateralization of the school district portfolio, the sale of bonds and creation of capital. "On day one, the money was there for a five-year delivery of the plan versus the 30-year average," as he outlined. A "big plus" was the compression of the debt service payment plan into five years.

  • A total of $1.35-billion has been spent in five years against a debt service of $1.8-billion
  • If it had been a 30-year plan, the total cost would have been $3.2-billion
  • Extended to the year 2052, it would have cost $4.9-billion
The school district has tax autonomy, and by essentially taking all of its real estate and facilities off the books in corporate sale-leaseback fashion, McKinney's team created ROI. One way was by adding $110-million in cash from the financial structure. He reported $96-million in "cost savings and avoidance" on top of the added cash. Results also include the first public high school nationally to be certified LEED® Platinum.

As of December, 2007, 70 buildings were completed, with 10 more about to be completed. The financing and project management aspects carried out by InRe enabled nearly 8-million square feet of new or renovated education space, McKinney concluded.

"We took 70 schools off the taxable books, collateralized through a non-profit, and the non-profit took it to Wall Street for capitalization," he pointed out. Would he be as likely to execute the plan with little or no capital available these days? "Not likely," he concedes, reminding everyone that sometimes timing is part of innovating, too.


GIA 2009, Johnson Controls
JCI's San Leonardi (bottom right) and Garrett Cannon (top left) pictured with sponsors Elliott Farber and Stephen Swicegood.
Johnson Controls:
Global Workplace Knowledge Center

This case speaks to the value of blending as the Johnson Controls (JCI) Global Workplace Solutions team explained about its knowledge center concept.

It's a center of excellence combining a variety of other key elements like client services, information gathering, data analysis, integration and even off-shoring.

It all starts inside the JCI Global Workplace Knowledge Center based in Manila, as outlined to the judges by JCI's Dan Leonardi and Garrett Cannon. The center is there to support JCI's $2-billion corporate services business line and represents one of the industry's largest-ever 'abstracting' projects - meaning emphasis on effective data analysis and information gathering on behalf of corporate and other clients.

The knowledge center integrates "disparate systems and sources into a single platform," according to Leonardi. "It's data richness for reporting." Transactions, portfolio and other real estate or related data are collected and analyzed across the asset life cycle for clients, but information is also used to help guide JCI's business internally, he added.

"The off-shored client support concept is staged in the Philippines because of the English-speaking population, cost advantages favoring labor arbitrage, and highly-educated local staffs who often hold multiple university degrees," as Cannon explained.

JCI regards its top client drivers as:
  • Data quality
  • Efficient, scalable resourcing
  • Cost savings
The advantages of labor arbitrage, a 24/7 workforce, and Six Sigma-like quality control processes also add up to more value for clients.

There are more than 100 full-time staff working in the center. Their shifts overlap by four hours, giving a base of 50 clients 'anytime, anywhere' access to the data and information they're seeking at a given moment. Plus, a 2:1 administrative-to-labor service ratio offers scalability by volume or cost reduction.

JCI stresses how it is really farming high quality business intelligence using client data in a transparent way to interpret a constant flow of information through multiple lines for decision support, benchmarking, business process management and more. One example is how the so-called Performance Diagnostics Center within the Manila office offers FM scorecards reflecting how service level agreements are being met, or not. "One client saw recent savings of $1-million over 13 months," Cannon related.

A "triple blind" abstracting process ensures data integrity, including within the sophisticated dashboards clients use in real time.

The JCI team reported a "nearly 100% mistake free abstraction rate" accounting for 25,000 client and JCI sites globally. "The information is now more actionable with more bang for the client's buck," ended Cannon.


GIA 2009 Mindshift
Mindshift presenters were (from left) Mark Iammarino, Dean Strombom and Rex Miller.
Mindshift Consortium
Nine Keys to Transform a Broken Industry

An irony of the long-running recession is that there's not yet a clear consensus on how the CRE industry will change along with an inevitable shift in business models.

While some industry leaders have told us that this downturn, as profound as it is, will not result in any sea-changes for CRE, there are some outliers or early adopters who disagree. Some of them would say that changing our industry's risk-reward model offers one such opportunity. Others are focused on transforming key parts of our supply chain.

One of them is Mindshift, a consortium of progressively-minded CRE interests specially designated as a 2009 Global Innovator's Finalist.

Mindshift has honed in on the way that corporate facilities are designed and built. For nearly three years, the group has changed the paradigm "from the fragmented self-serving, highly competitive process we've lived with for decades," according to Rex Miller, one of Mindshift's leaders. Joining him were Dean Strombom of Gensler and Mark Iammarino of Turner Construction.

Senior Leaders of CRE
Comprise Award Jury

Another impressive part of the Global Innovator's Award is the judges' panel consisting of some of the CRE (corporate real estate) industry's most experienced senior-level executives. CoreNet Global extends its gratitude to the 2009 panel for contributing the knowledge, expertise and time needed to assess the award nominees cases:

Panel Chair
Frank Robinson, McKesson Corp.
Jury Members
Roy Black, Emory University, Goizueta Business School
Sam Hunter, General Services Administration
Ed Nolan, Hewlett Packard
Trex Morris, Ernst & Young
Sam Unger, Ernst & Young
Roger Gaudette, Ford Land
Charemon Tovar, Sprint/CBRE
GIA 2009, judges and sponsors
CoreNet Global extends its gratitude to the seven industry leaders who served as award judges, and to the executives representing our award sponsors. Judges front row (from left): Roger Gaudette, Charemon Tovar and Sam Hunter. Judges second row (from left): Dr. Roy Black, Frank Robinson, Ed Nolan and Sam Unger. Sponsors (front row from right): Stephen Swicegood of Gensler and Elliott Farber of UGL Equis. (Photos by Amanda Brooks and Richard Kadzis)
Today, the consortium has evolved to a "trust-based, team-driven, integrated and sustainable approach based on implementing best practices that will dramatically cut costs, end delays and create better buildings," contended Miller, who comes from outside real estate and has written on the evolution of social media recently for Futurist Magazine.

"For owners," he emphasized, "this new way of doing business is a win-win," adding that for the CRE industry in general, "it's a top-to-bottom transformation."

Mindshift's approach isn't just vapor or concept. Miller backed the claim through a series of tangible client - provider projects that have overcome "bleak industry (performance) statistics" like nearly 70% of all projects coming in over budget and late, or up to half of the building process resulting in waste - not to overlook the reality that commercial buildings contribute 48% of all green-house gases.

Mindshift members include but also extend beyond: Gensler and Lucchesi Galati (architecture); Aardex and Transwestern (developer/broker); Turner and Solidus (construction); Haworth (furnishings); KPMG (tax); Acoustic Dimensions (engineering); GSA (owner/occupier); and AIA (trade group). All of them integrate with Miller and two other consultants (Gary Hamor and Kyle Davy).

By proactively addressing the full life cycle of a project, the players have attained a key criterion of the business case for sustainability resulting in lower cost, better ROI and higher-quality working environments for clients.

Miller said the Mindshift "connected the dots" between the various players who were already attempting new ways of doing business, "even though most in the industry were doing business as usual." Together, they formed "an almost revolutionary type of contract" surrounding best practices in AWS, BIM, LEED® and other innovative areas.

Since the group's leaders "represented the top of the building 'food chain,'" Miller points out, "they had a real opportunity to change the building paradigm."

Miller insists that Mindshift "really can produce well-designed, sustainable buildings on time and on budget," as reflected by a series of successful projects done by the group:
  • For example, Mindshift reduced the construction schedule for AmerisourceBergen by 25%
  • The consortium delivered LEED® Platinum for the Signature Center for $3 less per square foot than conventional construction, along with having it 100% pre-leased and reducing energy costs by 45%
  • The group has also worked for the New York Times, Autodesk, Compuware and Sutter Heath, sometimes using an innovative, single-page contract guaranteeing consistent results, costs, move-in dates and no change orders.
"With this system, everyone benefits, including the industry itself," Miller concludes.

If you need further proof, look no further than Mindshift's new book published in July by John Wiley & Sons –The Commercial Real Estate Revolution: Nine Transforming Keys to Lowering Costs, Cutting Waste and Driving Change in a Broken Industry.


GIA 2009, NBBJ
NBBJ's Erin Shaw explained the philosophy behind the firm's new Seattle headquarters building. She is pictured with Stephen Swicegood of Gensler.
NBBJ
223 Yale Street, Seattle

Effective solutions can also be simple. That was one of the messages behind Erin Shaw's presentation on behalf of NBBJ, where she works as an interior designer. She demonstrated how as an architectural firm NBBJ decided to become the anchor tenant in an under-used part of Seattle known as Southlake Union. Spurred by funding from Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, the neighborhood has undergone a renaissance in recent months, including NBBJ's home office at 223 Yale Street that is owned by Allen and occupied by other businesses, too.

It's part of a mixed-use development scheme for the now-emerging section of the city. Retail and residential are its other vital components, along with handy highway access, a new trolley line and a nearby bus hub. Amazon recently moved an office into the area, and another major corporate tenant is about to announce its presence.

Aside from "pioneering in the neighborhood" in the sense of being one the first companies to move into the area, NBBJ also made a statement around sustainability. Shaw summarized the two leading innovations of the case in this context:
  • A hybrid HVAC system
  • A living building
The building design has operable windows allowing for low and high circulation of outside air when temperatures allow - a frequent option in the Pacific Northwest.

There's special light coding to indicate when it's OK to open the windows and that the HVAC system is not operating. Green signifies open windows. Yellow means closed windows.

Other features like motorized blinds in public spaces help control internal temperature. A raised floor system is part of the HVAC delivery system, and there's no carpet.

NBBJ has realized 49% in energy savings since occupying the building in February, 2006, according to Shaw. There's been a 10% increase in employee attendance in the same period, and NBBJ is a company that offers or evens expects telework.

Maybe one reason is that "everyone has 100% access to day light," Shaw observed. It's another indication of NBBJ's desire to make 223 Yale a "living building" - one in which AWS, mobility and telework complement the progressive design scheme but one in which everyone is walking the talk of sustainability.

"It's like a mind shift in how we work, even in how we live," added Shaw, who has moved into the neighborhood is only a few minutes' walk from the office.

Part of the shift is seen through the project managers involved in 223 Yale's development. Each of them became LEED® certified. It's also reflected through the 41% of employees who use mass transit. Another example is that average space per person runs a fairly tight 180 square feet or less. Or, it can be seen through NBBJ's new on-site composting program.

Another reason, in classic fashion, that it's working is because of change management. Clear and constant communication –along with community outreach –was the key to building awareness and gaining broad-based support.

As the central staircase of NBBJ's home office reflects through its dual role as company auditorium, "We are a resource-efficient culture," as Erin Shaw closed.


GIA 2009, Southwest Michigan First
Ron Kitchens (left) and Heather Smith of Southwest Michigan First pause with sponsor Elliott Farber of UGL Equis.
Southwest Michigan First:
Kalamazoo, Collaboration and the Power of Two

Another excellent public-private partnership case came through Southwest Michigan First.

The group won CoreNet Global's Economic Development Leadership Award two years ago with its 'Community Capitalism' model. It's a privately-funded venture concept that works to the benefit of Kalamazoo, a Michigan town hard hit by the devolution of the American auto and paper industries, and the exit of a global pharmaceutical maker.

Now, after a couple of years, community capitalism has been given a chance to work, and it's done well, as Ron Kitchens, CEO of Southwest Michigan First, outlined. Well enough that it secured a nomination for the 2009 Global Innovator's Award.

Upjohn Pharmaceuticals had been a big part of Kalamazoo's employment base before a series of mergers ending with Pfizer resulted in 4,000 lost jobs. A big GM plant and some paper mills had also closed, but Upjohn had been there since 1885. "We had 4-million square feet of space go empty overnight," Kitchens remarked.

The power of two concept then formed around two Pfizer research lab buildings totaling 500,000 square feet. Luckily, they had been renovated before Pfizer vacated them. In fact one key step was when the company agreed to sell the buildings to the community for $10 instead of mothballing or demolishing them.

Two essentially market-ready buildings were available, but how do you compete against a total of at least 20-million square feet of lab space globally, according to benchmarking done by Kitchens?

One solution became to look from within, or in this case next door, to the community. Neighboring Mattawan, Michigan is home to a specialty lab and research operation known as MPI Research. It was founded and is chaired by a great-grandson of Upjohn.

"We were able to maintain the long bio-science heritage of the area" by getting MPI to expand to the two empty Pfizer towers in downtown Kalamazoo," Kitchens recounted, so that the power of two was expanded to two communities. This meant Mattawan did not lose any jobs to Kalamazoo because MPI was expanding, not relocating.

The state of Michigan also needed to help. Kitchens and his team were able to get the state legislature to redraft an old bill enabling so-called "Renaissance Zones" in order to get the right incentives in place for MPI to select Kalamazoo over other competing markets like China. "It was the only bill to get through during a seven-month budget impasse in state government," Kitchens pointed out.

"The area's long-term strategy is paying off," claimed Heather Smith of Southwest Michigan First. For an economy-ravaged Midwestern Rust Belt city, the real differentiator lies in Kalamazoo's community capitalism model.

It's a privately funded model that has grown to become a $100-million venture capital source, "the largest ever for community-based funds," Smith estimated. It's a five-pronged plan that combines place with capital, infrastructure, education and talent. "Southwest Michigan is an equity investor in companies using the fund," Kitchens later added. A business incubator approach is one of the model's hallmarks.

He stressed that it's been important for the group to stay independent of government and yet still be able to help out the public sector along with the community, of course. "Our budget is self-generated through investors and contributors, so we're able to stay independent from local and state government, yet we're even funding some government projects."

Kitchens and Smith closed their presentation by sharing copies of their book, Community Capitalism: Beyond Kalamazoo.


GIA 2009, Woods Bagot
Woods Bagot presenters Nicholas Holt (left) and Jeremy Singer (second from right) were joined by sponsors Elliott Farber and Stephen Swicegood (far right).
Woods Bagot:
Out in PUBLIC

While the Mindshift and NBBJ cases touched on the concept of self-funded, evidence-based design that helps fuel a less expensive but sustainable building life cycle, Woods Bagot explained how it had started a business unit around it.

The Australia-based architectural and design firm has "hard wired" two percent of its annual revenues so it rolls back into funding a self-standing research arm called PUBLIC.

A lot of the findings and content published through this channel is available in the public domain, yet some of the research is done specifically to meet client needs or win client accounts, as the two New York-based presenters for Wood Bagot spelled out the details of the research-driven model.

All of the research results are linked across the firm's major areas of focus: business, education and life styles, as Jermey Singer and Nicholas Holt related.

Woods Bagot is "an ideas driven, not process driven studio," as Singer described the company culture. One of the "fundamental underpinnings of the firm," he continued, is its research driven to clients.

Singer and Holt walked through a handful of cases illustrating the connection of Woods Bagot research to industry findings and/or client benefit.
  1. Report on Flexibility for Research Buildings - Its initial purpose was to inform a client bid but it was later used as "the backbone" for a Public report on the same topic
  2. Qatar Science & Technology Park - A report on this innovative, flexible workplace environment in the Middle East touched on collaborative environments as they apply to laboratory buildings
  3. 21st Century Guide to Luxury - It shows how life style enhances innovation as seen through the development of the Melbourne Convention Center, a project involving Woods Bagot in its home town. As a Six-Star Green Star, it's the highest-rated green convention center in Australia and was funded by a public-private partnership
  4. Let There Be Light - Day Light Study - This report stressed the analytical tools needed for environmental analysis and centered on Australia's highest-rated spec office building, a Five-Star Green Star located in Adlai
  5. Measuring Performance in the Workplace - A classic opportunity to differentiate between measuring efficiency and effectiveness, this research examined the firm's Eversheds project in London, which won the 2009 Sustainable Leadership Award for Design and Development cosponsored by CoreNet Global, AIA and IIDA. It was Europe's first-ever BREEAM project score to be raised from good to excellent for a retrofit.
The innovation in the Eversheds case was the post-occupancy data that predicts high-levels of acceptance by younger workers for future working conditions at the London law firm.


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