2010 H. Bruce Russell Global Innovator's Award

2010 H. Bruce Russell Global Innovator's Award



Prior Winners:
  2011   |   2010   |   2009   |   2008   |   2007   |   2006   |   2005   |   2004   |   2003-2000     


11th Annual Global Innovator’s Award Goes to Space Matrix
for Bangalore Sustainable Housing Development

Anup Naik, Director - Architecture (left) and Alan A. Barr, Regional Director accept the Global Innovator's Award for Space Matrix.
A project proving that sustainable living in the urban areas of India is not only economically and technically viable, but can also be comfortable and manageable for individuals was selected today as winner of the 11th Annual CoreNet Global – H. Bruce Russell Global Innovator’s Award.

Space Matrix received the honor for its design and implementation of a residential campus in Bangalore that provides living infrastructure for India’s fast-growing sector of service workers.

It’s the first-ever such recognition of an actual case from a developing nation awarded by CoreNet Global, the world’s leading professional association for corporate real estate and workplace executives, as well as for service providers and economic developers.

“In a direct sense,” commented CoreNet Global Vice President of Knowledge Services Tim Venable, “Space Matrix addressed all three key sectors represented within CoreNet Global, accommodating the needs of employees in a sustainability context extending to economic development and service provision.”

Highlights from Space Matrix’s Winning Case
India is one of the fastest-growing economies of the world fueled by the growth of various sectors, most notably the service sector. As a result, development has a direct implication on all support infrastructure; housing serving as a primary need. Known as “Sustainable Urbanism”, TZED is a celebration of modern technology and its progression toward more common ecological concerns. The project aims to prove that sustainable living in the urban areas of India is not only economically and technically viable, but can also be comfortable and manageable for individuals. This residential campus features many firsts: LEED Platinum-rated residential apartment, central air (with no CFC and HCFC), no water supply from outside the community and treated and reused waste. All residences are currently occupied and sold out.

In winning the prestigious award, Space Matrix joins an impressive list of past winners with global brand recognition including the Royal Bank of Scotland, Cisco Systems, McKesson, Johnson Controls Inc. and Sun Microsystems (now Oracle).

Global Innovator Award Judges – Top row from left: Roy Black, Emory University; Daniel Johnson, Accenture; Kevin Kampschroer, General Services Administration; Frank Robinson, McKesson Corp.; Con Davis, Visa; Trex Morris, Americas Real Estate Services. Bottom row from left: Charemon Tovar, CB Richard Ellis; Elliott Farber, UGL Equis (not a judge, but a sponsor); Constance Van Rhyn, PepsiCo.; Alan Carswell, Stanley Black & Decker. Not pictured: Roger Gaudette, Ford Land.
An important deciding factor in the award judges’ selection of the winner was Space Matrix’s TZED (Towards Zero Energy Development) model, India’s first LEED® Platinum-rated housing development in Bangalore, which houses 80 residential units and 15 stand-alone homes.

“Consensus among the judges in selecting Space Matrix was they left no brick unturned in their presentation,” according to Venable. “Numerous thinkers and designers in developing systems and innovations that clearly were in the realm of out-of-the box ideas and thinking, most notably the fact that they looked at off-site construction waste.”

Leading practitioners from the real estate industry judged the competition and commented on the winning case.

“In addition to the process/approach being the innovation, many of the specific solutions they delivered were, in their own right, innovative and also represented transferable thinking to the industry at large,” said Daniel Johnson of Accenture.

Frank Robinson with McKesson added, “Firms can learn a lesson from TZED, in terms of taking the same approach of looking at every aspect of the project from a sustainability standpoint. And it has a financial payback.”

GIA Finalists, Sponsors and Judges
11th Annual CoreNet Global – H. Bruce Russell Global Innovator’s Award Finalists, Sponsors and Judges
The five presenting finalists were: Space Matrix, FXFOWLE, Greater Waco Chamber of Commerce, Kansas City Area Development Council and WICELY.

– Richard Kadzis with David Heaton


Thanks to Our Award Sponsors
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Corporate Real Estate's Top Practitioners Compete at Emory University
for 11th Annual H. Bruce Russell Global Innovator's Award

Emory University
Corporate real estate's (CRE’s) top professionals traveled from across the globe and came together at Emory University in Atlanta, August 2-3, 2010, to compete for CoreNet Global's H. Bruce Russell Global Innovator's Award (GIA). The prestigious industry event has now entered its 11th year, and for the second year in row, the case competition was held at Emory University’s Goizueta Business School, thanks to the hospitality provided by Professor Roy Black.

The 2010 GIA winner was announced at Salute, a Celebration of Accomplishment, which took place following the Grand Opening Reception during the CoreNet Global Summit in Phoenix on 19 September 2010.

The five presenting finalists, whose cases truly spanned a wide array of innovation, included: Space Matrix, FXFOWLE, Greater Waco Chamber, Kansas City Area Development Council and WICELY.

SPACE MATRIX with Sponsors
Global Innovator's Award Space Matrix winners Anup Naik and Alan Barr (right) pictured with Elliott Farber, UGL Equis (sponsor) and Kevin Kampschroer, General Services Administration (judge).
How it works

For purposes specific to the GIA, innovation is defined as an activity or initiative that brings about a paradigm shift in the way business is done in a rapidly globalizing economy. It produces a new concept to practice and makes it a commercial success. It concerns the search for and the discovery, experimentation, development, imitation and adoption of new products, processes and organizational set-ups.

Launched in 2000, the GIA winners have spanned a wide geography, crossed multiple private and public sectors, touched on a diverse range of disciplines and brought an incredible array of precedent-setting case studies. The GIA winner is selected by peers with considerable real estate, workplace, service provider and academic experience.

Highlights from the five presentations include:

Biodiversity Conservation India/SPACE MATRIX Design Consultants
India is one of the fastest-growing economies of the world fueled by the growth of various sectors, most notably the service sector. As a result, development has a direct implication on all support infrastructure; housing being a primary need. Known as “Sustainable Urbanism,” T-Zed is a celebration of modern technology and its progression toward more common ecological concerns. The project aims to prove that sustainable living in the urban areas of India is not only economically and technically viable, but can also be comfortable and manageable for individuals. This residential campus features many firsts: LEED® Platinum-rated residential apartment, central air (with no CFC and HCFC), no water supply from outside the community, waste treated and reused. All residences are currently occupied and sold out.

FXFOWLE Center for Global Conservation
Three mandates guided the Center of Global Conservation’s (CGC) design: Sensitively integrate the building with its site at New York’s Bronx Zoo, foster a greater sense of occupant well-being through strong connections to nature and do so with minimal energy and resource use. The building itself is an innovation and an embodiment of CGC’s global conservation mission; demonstrating that sustainable biophilic design can be replicated worldwide. The CGC achieved LEED Gold certification with a maximum number of credits for IEQ through integrated architectural/mechanical strategies. The CGC has set the standard for innovative design on the zoo’s campus as one of the first buildings constructed under the new Bronx Zoo Master Plan guidelines.

James Vaughn
James Vaughan giving his presentation on the Greater Waco Chamber of Commerce.
Greater Waco Chamber of Commerce
The Greater Waco Chamber of Commerce received the LEED® Gold designation for its new headquarters. The facility is the first LEED-Certified Chamber of Commerce building in America and the first green building in Waco, Texas. The Chamber pursued a green building to lead the business community toward a long-term, forward-thinking approach to growth. The facility is conserving water and energy and promoting the use of alternative and renewable fuels, thus reducing CO2 emissions and eliminating waste. The Chamber wanted to show that it is possible to build attractive, functional and high-efficiency buildings that reduce waste and utilize sustainable products and materials. As a result, 12 other projects have been completed or are under construction that are LEED certified in Waco.

Kansas City Area Development Council
Kansas City Area Development Council Team from left: Bob Marcusse, Roxanne Elliott, Lynn Parman, Dr. Dan Getman
Kansas City Area Development Council
Kansas City became known as a “Cowtown” in 1871 with the opening of the Stockyards. For years, this overshadowed efforts to make the region a leader in science and technology. In 2005, a review of the region’s biosciences industry found the animal health sector offered a new economic growth opportunity. Thus, a grassroots effort to develop this industry began; Brakke Consulting, the top animal health consulting firm quantified the industry and found Kansas City has the world’s largest concentration of animal health industry assets, one-third of the global industry sales. As a result, the KC Animal Health Corridor was launched in 2006, and since that time, 16 animal health organizations have successfully been recruited or expanded in the region.

Kansas City Area Development Council Team from left: Bob Marcusse, Roxanne Elliott, Lynn Parman, Dr. Dan Getman
WICELY
WICELY takes the concept of an “activity-based office” for mobile working and converts it into a reality. Using a true measurement and assessment of activities instead of just occupancy levels, WICELY’s Activity-Based Office Optimization Toolkit (ABOOT) provides a scientific and reliable method for defining the types and amount of space required to support a generic solution that stands the test of time without changing the designed office environment once it is built. Tried and tested by clients such as Alcatel-Lucent and Fortis Bank, the tool can be used remotely by training client representatives. Results are interpreted by WICELY, providing the client with a customized but standard solution throughout the organization.

©CoreNet Global 2010